Lot Wasn’t Perfect… And I’m Not Any Better…

This weekend at church, we had a visiting seminary student preach. It was a good message in a lot of ways. It also really caused me to reflect on Lot’s life, God’s Election and some of the topics I’ve been recently posting about here.

I want to explore something that I often hear folks say about Christians. It may sound different but the premise is the same. It goes something like this:

You all think you are perfect and better than everyone else. You think you can be the moral police of the world and you judge the world by your standards. But you aren’t any better. Stop being so high and mighty. Stop being so holier than thou.

Lot was saved. He was saved out of a corrupt and wicked city. The sin wasn’t just the “much talked about sin” evidenced by the men wanting to beat down Lot’s door to “know” the messengers sent to visit the city. The sin was to the point where even Lot was willing to give up his own virgin daughters to appease the men. It was to the point where selfishness, greed, and everyone doing what was right in their own eyes was the common thing. It was a city where not even ten righteous men could be found…

But it was also a city where not even one could be found, really. You see Lot didn’t participate in every sin of the city. He seemed to rise above the well known sin of the city. He kept himself pure perhaps on the outside. He appeared good – by the yardstick of man. When measuring among the folks he lived with, he seemed “alright”. So the quote above could be said of him. Someone could call him “Little Goody Two Shoes”.

I don’t know what Lot felt of himself. I don’t know what his own assessment of himself was. I’ve heard him talked about in good terms by others, though. He escaped. He didn’t do “that bad stuff” and he got away from the city and tried to protect the angels and he even gave them hospitality for their visit.

I imagine that we sometimes engage in thinking like this. Actually let me rephrase that – I know that I fall into this trap. The trap of thinking, “Well….  I do this, I do that, I go to church, I don’t engage in this, I don’t engage in that.” I start looking horizontally and think a bit higher of myself than I ought to. It’s often said that you can always find someone worse than yourself. So I find the easy targets and look at myself on the outside – in how I stack up.

There are two things related to this line of thought here in Lot’s story though. One a warning/reminder for the Christian who finds him or herself thinking more highly of ourselves than we ought to (and I’m talking mostly to me here). The other is a reminder for those who just assume that that’s the default position a Christian has. It shouldn’t be – and that’s a shame.

Look at Lot’s Departure!

12 Then the men said to Lot, “Have you anyone else here? Sons-in-law, sons, daughters, or anyone you have in the city, bring them out of the place. 13 For we are about to destroy this place, because the outcry against its people has become great before the Lord, and the Lord has sent us to destroy it.” 14 So Lot went out and said to his sons-in-law, who were to marry his daughters, “Up! Get out of this place, for the Lord is about to destroy the city.” But he seemed to his sons-in-law to be jesting.

15 As morning dawned, the angels urged Lot, saying, “Up! Take your wife and your two daughters who are here, lest you be swept away in the punishment of the city.” 16 But he lingered. So the men seized him and his wife and his two daughters by the hand,the Lord being merciful to him, and they brought him out and set him outside the city.17 And as they brought them out, one said, “Escape for your life. Do not look back or stop anywhere in the valley. Escape to the hills, lest you be swept away.”Geneis 19:15-17 ESV (Emphasis Added)

See that? Lot wasn’t packed and ready to leave. In fact in Genesis 19 you can see a few things Lot got wrong. But here in these verses? His sons-in-law didn’t respect him or take him seriously. That says something. It says he was comfortable and so were they. But then his exit from the destruction that did reign wasn’t even something he effected. He was “seized” by these messengers of God and dragged outside of the city. Later in life Lot couldn’t look back and say “Yup.. I was good enough, and I saved myself from that mess.” Instead he had to look back, mourn the loss of his wife and say, perhaps with embarrassment, “I didn’t even have the sense to leave the mess.. I had to be seized and brought out of the city…I was willing to give up my own daughters. I lived among filth and didn’t separate myself from it, I didn’t lead my family in a God honoring way.. I wanted to stay!” And these verses didn’t say “Lot earned his spot outside of the city safe and sound”, it says that his being carried away was an example of “T\the Lord being merciful to him.”

These lyrics in Lecrae’s Lucky Ones come to mind here:

Under the sun, I found we were left to drown
Evil abounds, weight is pullin’ us down
No sight or sound, impaired to His care
Chasing after the wind, running after the air
Deserving of desertion, servants of destruction
And everyday we taste of a grace that we’re unconcerned with
My sin I should be burned with, I’m guilty, filthy, and stained
But He became a curse, drank my cup and took my pain
And for that he reigns, through faith I’m changed
And I don’t have a reason why he loosened up my chains

I don’t believe in luck; I believe in Grace
But they say we’re lucky cause we seen His face
And we heard Him call us, and He heard our answer
And He gives us second chances when we throw our hands up
So weary and broken, hopin’ His arms will be open
Unconditional love has got us locked into His focus
(I guess we the luck ones, huh?)

The only thing different between me and someone who is outside of Christ – is that I’m receiving mercy. Unmerited favor. Jesus paid for my sins – and my sins are many.  There is even less difference between Lot and I, though. I had to be carried away from the punishment of my sins. I love my sin and myself. I love being comfortable.

Christian – when we see ourselves as better than those who aren’t Christ’s – we miss the truth about our sin sickened hearts. We miss just how rotten we are. Because we are looking at the situation horizontally. “Less bad than the men beating down the door” isn’t perfect. It isn’t anything to brag about. Let us boast in Christ for what He did to us. Let us remember that we were pulled from the wreckage of our lives by God, we didn’t walk out of the mess and then he found us.. He pulled us away. In spite of our complete and total lack of deserve. We are sinners. We are totally depraved and unable to save ourselves. We aren’t His because there was some spark of something good or worthy in us! We are looking back, hesitant to leave.. 

Friend who isn’t a Christian – Don’t assume that because I am Christ’s I think myself any better than you. I’m not. I’m no different in any respect except for the fact that my sins have been paid for by Christ. Paul called himself the chief of sinners – and the model of his words should apply to me. When I say something like “Your sins are keeping you from Christ” I don’t mean that in any other way than – “I know this is true, because I’m just like you. I screw up still. There isn’t an hour that goes by that I am awake that I don’t do, think or act out some sort of sin. I deserve Hell – more than you perhaps. I’m His. I’m declared righteous in God’s sight and have His power changing my nature every day. I want you to have that too. Not because I get points, not because it gives me a feeling of superiority – but because I love you and care about you and know all about your state, we have more in common than not.”

Let’s look to Lot the next time we think more highly of ourselves. Let’s look to Lot the next time we think we brought anything to our salvation other than the sin that needed forgiving. 

3 thoughts on “Lot Wasn’t Perfect… And I’m Not Any Better…

  1. Stephen Moore

    Really enjoyed this. A sermon I’ve heard on Lot before also mentions this progression when he separates from Abram:

    Gen 13:12 – Lot pitched his tent _near_ Sodom
    Gen 14:12 – Lot was living _in_ Sodom
    Gen 19:1 – Lot was sitting at the city gates

    The city gates are often where important business was conducted, court was held, announcements were made, etc. By this point was Lot a leader in the community?

    Lot slowly integrates himself into and becomes more comfortable with a society that didn’t share his values. And by the end, he looks a lot like them.

    Reply
    1. Mike Walsh Post author

      Great point Stephen. And thanks for sharing. Reminds me of Brian Kelley recently sharing how Psalm 1 was convicting him – about sitting at the seat of the scoffers.

      Psalm 1 followed this same progression. Perhaps the psalmist was informed by Lot’s life when pondering this:

      “Blessed is the man
      who walks not in the counsel of the wicked,
      nor stands in the way of sinners,
      nor sits in the seat of scoffers;
      2 but his delight is in the law of the Lord,
      and on his law he meditates day and night.”

      The blessed man doesn’t sit in the seat of scoffers but that is because first he doesn’t stand in the way of sinners and get invited to have a seat at the gate.. And he doesn’t stand in their way and stop and chat and get intrigued by them because he doesn’t walk in the counsel of the wicked.. No. He’s too busy being delighted by the Word of God he mediates on day and night.

      What a great picture. And what a scary realization. So if we aren’t meditating on his word and being delighted primarily by that – then we’re more likely to do that few step dance Lot did. That’s a humbling truth.

      Thanks for sharing. Thanks for making me think. And thanks for leading me to feel a little uncomfortable with myself, friend.

      Reply

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